December 2016 Patient of the Month

FROSTYN'S STORY

My name is Frostyn and I am an all white Siberian Husky. I am originally from Georgia and they say I was picked up as a stray. I knew where I was and I knew where I was going, but if “stray” makes everyone happy, then that’s okay. I was taken to a place called a kill shelter and fortunately, a rescue organization found me there and got me out. They put my picture on the internet and that’s how my Dad found me. Everyone thinks I’m about eight years old and I’ll let them go on believing that. As everyone knows, a lady doesn’t reveal her true age!

In order to tell you about my journey with the Veterinary Medical Center, I have to begin by telling you about my “sister” Holly. Holly was also a Siberian Husky and even though she was six years older than me, we were the very best of friends. We were both agility dogs (I still am), but a couple of summers ago, Holly became lame. She couldn’t even put any weight on one of her front feet. My Dad was reluctant to use any of those medications on her, so he took her to see Dr. Polly Fleckenstein. To make a long story short, Holly made a complete recovery and returned to agility competition less than a year later because of what Dr. Polly & Lis Conarton did for her. Holly continued to see both of them and continued her agility career until she passed away a little over a year ago, so I have continued in the agility ring without Holly.

My Dad has recently been concerned because, after my first run of the day, whether in class or in competition, I would always slow down. At first he thought it was all in my mind, but then decided he should make sure the problem was not physical. Of course, after the miraculous work done by Dr. Polly & Lis for Holly, the first place my Dad thought to bring me was the Veterinary Medical Center. My Dad had been taking me to VMC when he brought Holly for her appointments, so it was really good to see all my old friends.

Everyone treats me so good when I visit. My Dad already had me on some supplements, but Dr. Polly put me on a couple more. She has been doing acupuncture and spinal manipulation on me and Lis is doing laser treatment on me. Lis has given my Dad lots of work to do at home, including stretching, massage, and exercises to strengthen my abdominal muscles. It’s only been a couple of months, but I feel so much better! My performance in class and in competition has been so much more consistent. Dr. Polly & Lis were able to tell where I was sore and concentrate on those areas. My lower back was really bothering me.

As much as my Dad loves me and understands me, he doesn’t have the knowledge to be able to determine where I’m sore. It’s really important that I feel good since my Dad relies on me to keep him busy. In addition to agility, I take him to rally/obedience class and we also compete in those events. Dad and I are also a pet therapy team with PAWS of CNY. I take him with me to schools where the students read to me and to a home where the people don’t remember me each time we come. We have also done some other activities with PAWS of CNY such as de-stress events at Syracuse University and participated in 4th of July parades.

I’m going to make sure my Dad continues to bring me for treatments with Dr. Polly & Lis so that I’m at my best. Without me to keep him going, I’m afraid he would get bored and lazy!                                 

Frostyn's issues:

  • back pain
  • muscle pain

Frostyn's treatments: 

  • Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) 
  • VSMT (veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapy)
  • Acupuncture
  • Chinese Herbal Therapy
  • Supplements
  • Massage
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization
  • Postural Balance Exercises & Home Exercise Program

Albuterol toxicity in Pets: Where's your inhaler?

ventolin-inhaler-02-1 Millions of people in the United States suffer from asthma.  Many of these people have inhalers to use during an attack.   These inhalers are composed of a small pressurized canister that contains a solution of asthma medicine fitted into a plastic casing that releases a precise dose of the medicine in an aerosol form.  The medicine contained in many asthma inhalers is albuterol, a drug used to relax the muscles in the lungs and allow the air passages to open.

The size and (we think) the smell of the inhalers make them very attractive and interesting to our dogs.  Dogs are easily able to puncture the canister if they chew on it. Since the canister is pressurized, the entire contents are released instantly, resulting in almost certain overdose of the medication. In an overdose, these drugs affect both the muscles of the lungs as well as the muscles of the heart. The results are immediate, severe, and include the following:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Red gums
  • Increased respiratory rate / excessive panting
  • Abnormal behavior (restlessness/agitation, hiding, tremors, shaking, lethargy, weakness, collapse)
  • Low or high blood pressure
  • Vomiting
  • Severe changes in blood electrolytes (particularly potassium)
  • Seizures
  • Shock
  • Acute death

If you know that your pet has bitten into an inhaler, you should seek care at the nearest emergency veterinary facility.  Bring the inhaler and the original packaging if it is available, as well as any medications that your pet is currently taking. Do not induce vomiting at home.

cute-albuterol-toxicity-patient

Dogs suffering from albuterol toxicity will typically need to stay in the hospital for 12 - 48 hours.  Treatment will include sedation, aggressive IV fluids, blood work (to monitor the electrolyte levels), drugs to slow the heart rate down, and heart and blood pressure monitoring. With prompt and appropriate treatment, albuterol toxicity is rarely fatal, although pets with heart conditions and pets on medications that interact poorly with albuterol are at higher risk for serious complications.

Veterinary Medical Center of CNY's Emergency veterinarians are available 24/7/365 to help you and your pet through these types of emergencies, but we will be just as happy if you can avoid them!  Keep these and all other medications out of reach of your pets.  Also avoid disposing of used canisters in trash cans that are accessible to pets. Used inhalers can still contain enough medication to be dangerous.

November Patient of the Month

Dorothy's Story, Part II

dorothy

You may remember that we featured Dorothy's story a few months back.  She is a senior dog who was left on the street when her owners decided it was too much trouble to care for her and her medical problems.  If you missed our original post about her, you can catch up here: http://wp.me/p2pFC1-bk

We have an update from her family, about how Dorothy's care has been going since that original article:

Once Dorothy had recovered from all her urgently necessary treatments, it was time to begin focusing on the rest of her.  It was clear by her posture, movements and body language that she was experiencing pain all over her body. Dorothy was evaluated by Dr. Burnett and prescribed a regimen of pain management medications, laser and massage therapy.  Dorothy has been visiting Lis and Dr. Burnett for 10 months now and has shown remarkable improvements.  She has always enjoyed her walks around the neighborhood but now runs around the yard like a puppy, tossing her favorite rubber ducky into the air!  There was a time that she would run away from a massage at home and tremble when you would touch or try to stretch her. Now she can’t get enough of her massages and stretches.  She still needs work and is not 100% but she has come leaps and bounds from where she was 10 short months ago.  If you look into her eyes close enough you will see that she is saying thank you to VMC and CARE for significantly reducing her pain and allowing her to live again!  

We thank you from the bottom our hearts!  

~ Dorothy's Family

 

Dorothy's issues:

  • Suspect chronic arthritis (hips/stifles) with compensatory muscle pain

Treatments:

  • Pain Medications
  • Supplements (Omega 3 Fatty Acids)
  • Physical Rehabilitation (laser and massage therapy)

 

VMC's October Patient of the Month

Blackjack's Story

blackjack

Hello, my name is Blackjack, everyone calls me Jack for short and my friends at daycare call me Jack-Jack as they have decided I like to hear my name. I am Lord Blackjack of Rambunctiousness as it could be seen by the look in my eyes I was destined for trouble from the very beginning.

I am a 7 year old black lab. I was having various limping episodes and had gone to see Doctor Goetz and Doctor Rodriguez at Manlius Veterinary Hospital. It was decided they needed an X-ray to confirm that I had a cruciate tear. Once that was confirmed I was sent to Doctor Robinson at Veterinary Medical Center for a consult for surgery. We discussed my options and decided that for my size the TPLO surgery was the way to go. The left side was also showing a tear so it was explained that the likelihood of the other side needing surgery at a later time was probable. So I had surgery in October and the follow-up X-rays as scheduled. I had not healed as fast as expected, (probably due to my inability to sit still) and required more time of sitting watching DogTV. Now don’t get me wrong, DogTV is great but I had things to do.

My Dad had heard that Lis would be great to help with recovery but she was booked weeks in advance and I just could not wait. So we made our appointment with Doctor Molly Flaherty and started laser and treadmill therapy. I get my chiropractic adjustment, too. And there was water involved!

My first session was all about what was expected of me.  Once we got the hang of it and toys got introduced I was hooked.  As expected four months after the first surgery the left leg was weakening and I needed another TPLO on that knee. Doctor Flaherty suggested starting laser the day after surgery and what a difference it made. It made a real difference with swelling and I healed a lot faster. I wish I had known for the first TPLO!

Since December I have been a weekly patient of Doctor Flaherty. I have laser and cannot wait for my turn at the water treadmill; splashes for everyone! I love coming to VMC for water fun, visiting friends, hugs and cookies. My four months recovery after the second surgery is over I still want to continue coming to help build more muscle and maintenance for elbow dysplasia. The goal is to be able to go back to daycare and play with my human and canine friends. There are more lakes out there to play in. I am so thankful that Doctor Flaherty and Jen Waldron were able to help with my recovery and future success in having fun and making people happy.

~Blackjack & Family

 

 

VMC September Patient of the Month

Bevyn's Story

bevyn

In December of 2015, I noticed a small growth on the lower lip of my 4 year old Golden Retriever, Bevyn. I contacted his primary veterinarian and brought him in to be evaluated. They decided to perform a fine needle aspiration of the growth and had me continue to monitor the area for any changes. The fine needle aspiration was inconclusive and within a couple of weeks his front bottom teeth began to shift and there was obvious inflammation. Due to the sudden changes in his mouth, his vet performed x-rays of his jaw and she confirmed that a tumor was present.

I was beyond devastated. Unfortunately, due to his breed the vet prepared me for the “C” word, cancer. I was immediately referred to Dr. Rassnick at the VMC in January 2016. During the oncology consult, Dr. Rassnick discussed the options that were available for Bevyn and from there we started our journey at the VMC. A fine needle aspiration was initially performed on 2 lymph nodes to rule out any metastasis, thankfully they were both clear. A CT scan was performed to show the margins of the tumor and biopsies were taken which confirmed the diagnosis of fibrosarcoma.

The next step was meeting with Dr. Robinson for a surgery consult to remove the tumor. Dr. Robinson’s plan was to perform a bilateral rostral mandibulectomy (removing a large portion of his lower jaw). In March 2016, Bevyn’s surgery was a success and I was able to bring him home the day after surgery. Dr. Robinson’s surgical work on Bevyn’s mouth was wonderful. I had planned for alterations in Bevyn’s basic activities such as eating, drinking and playing with his toys but he has continued to prove me wrong! He is eating and drinking the same as before his surgery and he still enjoys finding sticks outside to chew on. Although we have hit some bumps in the road during Bevyn’s recovery and a few more than anticipated visits to the VMC, Bevyn is still my happy and energetic boy.

Bevyn is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatments with Dr. Rassnick to prevent any future regrowth or spread of the fibrosarcoma. The level of compassion and professionalism we have received from all of the staff at the VMC has been immense. I am thankful every day for the care that has been provided for Bevyn.

~Bevyn’s Mom

Diagnosis:

  • Oral Fibrosarcoma

Treatment:

  • Mandibulectomy surgery to remove tumor and section of affected jaw
  • Multiple chemotherapy treatments followed surgery due to his risk of tumor recurrence and spread

 

August 2016 Patient of the Month

Bailey's Story

Bailey
Bailey

Bailey is a 10 year old Golden Retriever who was named after Bailey’s Irish Cream as he became part of our family the day after St. Patrick’s Day, 2006. At the time, he joined our 6 year old Golden, Reilly, and our calico cat, Callie.

Bailey had always been an easy-going, healthy dog who loved his walks, had the run of our one acre yard, and couldn’t wait for summer so he could jump into the family pool. In early October 2015, Bailey decided to take off after the neighbor’s cat who was visiting in our yard. Running full speed ahead, he rounded a corner and went down with a yelp of pain. At that time, he lost use of his back end and could not walk or even support himself. He was transported to our vet at Stack Veterinary Hospital for evaluation. They did x-rays to evaluate Bailey, found no sign of any breaks, and felt he should be taken to the Cornell Companion Animal Hospital for a more comprehensive evaluation.

At Cornell, after an MRI, Bailey was diagnosed with an intramedullary lesions at T12-13 and multiple intervertebral disk protrusions caused by Lumbosacral Syndrome. The doctors at Cornell noted that he had some use of his right rear leg but no use of his left rear leg. They recommended that he remain at Cornell for several days for pain management and observation. Over that time, Bailey’s pain seemed to diminish somewhat and his ability to use his right leg improved. He was, at this time, discharged with the Help ‘Em Up harness so that we could help him get around.

Through all of this, we were in constant contact with our wonderful next-door neighbor,  Doctor Maureen Luschini from the Veterinary Medical Center. She gave us advice and helped us make sense of the “vet-speak” that we did not always understand. When Bailey came home, he really had NO use of his back left leg and was completely immobile without our help. His left rear limb hung limp and literally  dragged on the ground unless we picked up his hind quarters using the harness. Cornell gave us exercises to do several times daily and recommended 5 minute walks around the yard. In talking with Dr. Luschini,  we learned that acupuncture was available at Veterinary Medical Center and felt that this might help stimulate the nerves and muscles in Bailey’s leg and hasten his recovery.

He started his acupuncture treatments with Doctor Burnett about a week after he came home, and has continued with those treatments to date. Along with the acupuncture, Doctor Burnett taught us other stretches to do daily. We began to see improvements with Bailey’s ability to bear weight and actually stand on his own. We made a return visit to Cornell about six weeks after the initial episode and they were immensely pleased and pleasantly surprised with the progress Bailey had made. At that time they recommended physical rehab. We were so pleased with the care he received at Veterinary Medical Center, we decided to have his physical rehab done there also.

Bailey 2
Bailey 2

We consulted with Lis Conarton, their canine rehabilitation practitioner. Bailey started seeing Lis for laser therapy, massage and workouts using the underwater treadmill. It was a joyous day indeed when the harness came off for good and Bailey was able to walk on his own. We are so happy to say that Bailey has continued to improve. Although he walks with a limp, he is back to most of his normal activities. You can imagine our elation when Bailey actually ran for the first time since his accident. He continues to see both Dr. Burnett & Lis,  and looks forward to these visits. He is anxiously awaiting his first swim in their new rehab pool! Thanks to the exceptional care Bailey is receiving at the Veterinary Medical Center, we are thrilled to have our Bailey back.

~The Sullivan Family

Diagnosis:

  • Lumbosacral Syndrome
  • Intervertebral Disc Disease

Treatments:

  • Acupuncture
  • Physical Rehab (Laser Therapy & Hydrotherapy)
  • Pain Medications

July 2016 Patient of the Month

Oliver Abbey

Oliver's Story

This handsome boy is Oliver, the love of my life. He is a Maltese/Shih Tzu who will be 17 on July 22nd, 2016. Happy Birthday to my boy! Oliver’s first visit to the Veterinary Medical Center of CNY was in July 2004 with corneal ulceration and corneal edema of the right eye. We were referred to Doctor Burgesser who began treating Oliver for dry eye with ophthalmic drops. Doctor Burgesser continued to be his Ophthalmologist until his retirement from VMC in January 2016.

Oliver started having back issues the beginning of 2012. His veterinarian, Doctor Stokes-Cowley at Lyncourt Veterinary Hospital took radiographs and diagnosed the beginning of disk disease. He was given NSAID, pain and antispasmodic medication. Oliver was also seen at VMC in 2012 and 2013 for recurrent episodes.

Oliver Abbey 2

In November 2013 when the spasms became severe, he was seen by Doctor Fleckenstein, who diagnosed Oliver with Intervertebral Disc Disease. After her assessment , Doctor Fleckenstein prescribed laser acupuncture along with medication and supplements. I was also given exercises for Oliver at home. Without her present regimen, I do not believe Oliver’s quality of life would be what it is now. Thank you to Doctor Fleckenstein and Sue for the love and treats you spoil Oliver with.

Thank you, VMC staff!

Kathy & Oliver

Diagnosis:

  • Intervertebral Disc Disease
  • Corneal Edema (Right Eye)

Treatment:

  • Laser Acupuncture
  • Lateral Flexion Exercises
  • Warm Compress
  • Massage
  • Pain Medications & Supplements

Safety Nets

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Through some unusual circumstances, this sweet, homeless, and very broken little guy ended up in our care. We knew right away that we loved him, but such an extensive injury in a stray cat doesn't often point toward a happy ending.

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We, like so many other veterinary hospitals in our area, provide pro bono care for lost and abused pets on a daily basis. The sad truth of the matter is that the combined efforts of our veterinary community and our shelter/rescue community cannot possibly treat all the issues of every homeless animal in our area. Cats in particular have very little safety net at all. In many cases, a stray cat with such a profound and painful injury would have been euthanized.

We reached out to Animal Alliance of Greater Syracuse and their Leg Up Fund to see if they would be interested in sponsoring this cat's treatment.  Their answer was a resounding yes.  Almost simultaneously, one of our wonderful and compassionate Emergency Veterinarians fell in love with this lucky boy and adopted him (severely fractured leg and all) and transferred him into our surgical service for treatment. The Leg Up Fund wouldn't be necessary after all, and we're happy to report that this handsome boy is now all fixed up and enjoying his new home.

We’re proud of the Good Samaritans who went many extra miles to get this very injured kitty to a safe place.  We're proud of our talented surgical team who were able to neatly repair this complicated fracture. We have no idea how long ago this injury occurred, but it was definitely days after the ideal time for surgical repair. We're proud of yet another member of our staff who stepped in to provide a needy animal with a loving home and much needed medical care. We're proud of and grateful for Animal Alliance of Greater Syracuse and their Leg Up Fund for their willingness to provide a safety net for this and other homeless pets in need, even as we didn't need to lean on them in this case.

The Leg Up Fund is a relatively new initiative in CNY, but is already making a positive impact.  From the Animal Alliance of Greater Syracuse:

In the past 14 months nine homeless and ill pets have stepped into bright futures thanks to your support of AAGS’s LEG UP FUND!

We are honored to announce a new member has joined the LEG UP team—the Veterinary Medical Center of Central New York! With its dedicated staff and wide range of specialties, VMC joins Dewitt Animal Hospital-Shelter in providing the best possible veterinary care for seriously ill or injured strays in need of a leg up.

Most pets coming through the doors of veterinary practices have families to pay for what could be complex or long-term care. LEG UP pets have no one. Since most shelters are non-profits, ill strays who come through their doors can be the recipients of fundraising drives to cover their medical treatment.

LEG UP’s veterinary partners are not non-profits; donations to them are not tax-deductible. Therefore, they are not in position to mount funding appeals for homeless animals requiring significant care.

AAGS is not a shelter, rescue, or veterinary practice. We are an animal welfare advocacy group who can provide the needed fundraising service on behalf of these unowned pets. Since we are a 501c3, your LEG UP contributions to AAGS are fully tax-deductible and go directly to support the veterinary care of homeless pets.

Because donors like you have a special spot in your hearts for these vulnerable, deserving creatures, LEG UP has been able to raise thousands of dollars for a wide range of treatments: orthopedic repairs, heartworm, generalized mange, amputation, eye surgery, and more.

We post reports about each LEG UP recipient on the journey from being a discarded, unwanted animal to a beloved pet with a forever place in the heart and home of a family.

*To contribute online: Visit our Facebook page; the DONATE tab is under the cover photo: https://www.facebook.com/AnimalAlliance/

Or visit our website: http://www.animalallianceofgreatersyracuse.org

*To contribute by mail: AAGS, P.O. Box 94, Liverpool, NY 13088

*For all contributions, please note “Leg Up” in “Notes to Seller” or on the check.

Won’t you give a leg up?

June Patient of the Month

Raji and mom

Raji's Story

Raji started coming to the VMC in the summer of 2013, when he was 12 years old. He had been showing some signs of arthritis, especially in his back legs and part of his back. Sometimes he was also reluctant to go out on walks and we started to wonder if he might be having some pain. We’d gotten him on some supplements that our veterinarian (Dr. Capparelli) recommended (which definitely helped). However, it seemed like he needed something else to help with the stiffness and increasing reluctance to walk for as long as he used to. Our vet thought acupuncture from Dr. Fleckenstein here at the VMC might help to reduce pain and increase mobility.

Raji started seeing Dr. Fleckenstein and right away we noticed a decrease in the amount of twitching in his back when we petted him in certain areas. He also seemed to have more energy, and he was more interested for his normal walks. He also liked coming to see Dr. Fleckenstein and Sue, who assists with most of our visits and also gives great massages and treats! There is always a calm atmosphere and I think Raj feels very cared for. Dr. Fleckenstein has definitely helped with keeping Raj comfortable in his own body as he ages. She has helped to keep down pain and inflammation from arthritis, and worked out trigger points with the laser and needle acupuncture. Dr. Fleckenstein also recommended a ramp for getting him in and out of the car. This ramp has been so helpful, and it is light and easy to set up; he couldn’t get in the car without it!

In the fall of 2014, Raj started seeing Lis for Physical Rehabilitation. Dr. Fleckenstein recommended her and said she could add another dimension to his care. Lis started doing laser therapy and massage to release the increasing number of trigger points he had, and also made exercise suggestions for home. He liked coming for the rehab sessions and was very comfortable with her and her caring, gentle and friendly demeanor. At first Raji had to get up a few times during the sessions to “shake out” after her manual trigger point release, but as Lis worked with him and the trigger points became fewer, he could sit for whole sessions quite often as she worked her trigger point release magic! Lis also shows me various exercises to do with him. She gave some simple exercises and massage techniques for us to do at home to keep his range of motion as good as possible. We also do the massage techniques she shows us so we can keep some of the trigger points at bay. With the sessions with Lis, we can see changes in Raji immediately: he seems brighter and moves better after she works out all the kinks!

Raji

Just a few days ago, unfortunately, Raji had a vestibular episode. Our vet and the folks at VMC were kind enough to lend a hand. The VMC lent us a special harness to help him get up and walk. So far, he hasn’t been successful, but we are working on bringing him back to his old self. It is nice to know everyone is concerned and willing to help Raji get better. We look forward to resuming his therapies soon!

~McCoy Family

Diagnosis:

  • Rhinitis & Sinusitis
  • Presumptive Hind End Osteoarthritis & Weakness
  • Compensating Muscle Pain
  • Myofascial Trigger Points
  • Vestibular Syndrome

Treatment:

  • Acupuncture
  • Lacer Acupuncture
  • Low Level Laser Therapy
  • Dry Needle Trigger Point Therapy
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization
  • Myofascial Trigger Point Release (Manual)
  • Home Exercise Program
  • Medications, Multiple Herbal Therapies, Supplements

 

VMC's May Patient of the Month

Petunia's Story

Petunia

Petunia was the runt of her litter and we believe that is why her spirit is especially strong.  Since the day she came home with her brother Ruben, she has made it very clear that she is the alpha.  Although she may be tiny, she has always gone out of her way to prove that she is the ruler of the roost. It is especially humorous since Ruben and the rest of the animals could not care less.

At her very first vet visit, the doctor warned that she was a 'lemon' and she should be returned to the breeder. Obviously, this was out of the question.  Shortly after several consultations, she was taken to Los Angeles at just 3 months old to have surgery on her heart.  The procedure was very successful, reducing her heart murmur significantly. We were so relieved and Petunia's new strength was remarkable. Growing up in Sunny San Diego, the two Frenchies frequented dog beaches and parks; playing fetch was their favorite thing to do!  Petunia was fast and coordinated, bounding to get her ball. Unlike her brother who often tumbled and fumbled the ball -- he usually held on to it for dear life, knowing Petunia would happily have both balls to herself.

It was not until Petunia was 9 years old that she showed a change in her gait.  At first it was just once and a while, when running full speed for her ball, that her hind legs would go limp. She hardly seemed to notice and would still propel herself for the ball.  After several similar occurrences, we decided to have her seen by a neurosurgeon in Northern San Diego. After examining her, it was predicted that she had bulging discs in two parts of her spine. An MRI would confirm if surgery was even an option, knowing that surgery would only prevent more damage from being done, but would not reverse any of the immobility that she was already experiencing. With Petunia's heart condition and age, anesthesia for the MRI was not encouraged, let alone for the intensive surgery that may follow. The doctors noted that any pain she was experiencing was not affecting her attitude or eating habits and that we should proceed by minimizing her exertion at the park and try some anti-inflammatories to see if that may relieve any pressure in her spinal column. She tested out some mild steroids with little benefits.

Meanwhile, a move to Boston was in process and soon she met with the doctors at Angell Medical Hospital.  First she saw the neurosurgeons and heart specialist, seeking second opinions and advice on how to proceed.  At this point she was becoming more and more wobbly in her hips- coined as 'drunken sailor' movement.  Her spirit was still strong, but she was not able to move like she once had.  After concluding that any operation was too risky with no guarantee of positive results, she went to see Dr. Lisa Moses for acupuncture. After Petunia's first visit with Dr. Moses, she was noticeably more comfortable and showed strong action in her hind quarters. She found relief from pain and reduced inflammation immediately and it seemed like a miracle. As almost two years passed, Petunia's condition did continue to worsen, as expected.  She tried out water therapy and was fitted for some wheels. Still, it was obvious how much she rebounded after acupuncture. Her relief was visible and her love for Dr. Moses was palpable.

Petunia and Ruben 2

When Petunia moved to the Syracuse area, Dr. Moses recommended the VMC and Dr. Fleckenstein. For almost a year now she has been working with Dr. Fleckenstein and Lis. For the first time she was given exercises and stretches to work on at home. She started taking Chinese Herbs and has minimized her steroid intake, with positive results.  She looks forward to her weekly visits to see Dr. Fleckenstein, Sue, and our other lovely assistants. With ample treats and comfy bedding always set up, Ruben enjoys almost as much pampering when he comes along to accompany his sister. Together, we are all forever grateful for their tender and thoughtful care.  We simply cannot thank you enough!

~Gregg Family

Diagnosis:

  • Hind Limb Paraparesis Secondary to Presumptive Intervertebral Disc Disease and Congenital Vertebral Abnormalities

Treatment:

  • Acupuncture, Electroacupuncture & Lacer Acupuncture for Pain, Nerve Stimulation, Heart Disease, Urinary and Immune Support & General Well Being.
  • Methyl Prednisone, Gabapentin, Chinese Herbal Formula—Loranthus Powder
  • Canine Cart
  • Under Water Treadmill, Low Level Laser Therapy for muscle spasms and Home Exercise & Stretching Program including Home Water Therapy