dog pain

June Patient of the Month

Raji and mom

Raji's Story

Raji started coming to the VMC in the summer of 2013, when he was 12 years old. He had been showing some signs of arthritis, especially in his back legs and part of his back. Sometimes he was also reluctant to go out on walks and we started to wonder if he might be having some pain. We’d gotten him on some supplements that our veterinarian (Dr. Capparelli) recommended (which definitely helped). However, it seemed like he needed something else to help with the stiffness and increasing reluctance to walk for as long as he used to. Our vet thought acupuncture from Dr. Fleckenstein here at the VMC might help to reduce pain and increase mobility.

Raji started seeing Dr. Fleckenstein and right away we noticed a decrease in the amount of twitching in his back when we petted him in certain areas. He also seemed to have more energy, and he was more interested for his normal walks. He also liked coming to see Dr. Fleckenstein and Sue, who assists with most of our visits and also gives great massages and treats! There is always a calm atmosphere and I think Raj feels very cared for. Dr. Fleckenstein has definitely helped with keeping Raj comfortable in his own body as he ages. She has helped to keep down pain and inflammation from arthritis, and worked out trigger points with the laser and needle acupuncture. Dr. Fleckenstein also recommended a ramp for getting him in and out of the car. This ramp has been so helpful, and it is light and easy to set up; he couldn’t get in the car without it!

In the fall of 2014, Raj started seeing Lis for Physical Rehabilitation. Dr. Fleckenstein recommended her and said she could add another dimension to his care. Lis started doing laser therapy and massage to release the increasing number of trigger points he had, and also made exercise suggestions for home. He liked coming for the rehab sessions and was very comfortable with her and her caring, gentle and friendly demeanor. At first Raji had to get up a few times during the sessions to “shake out” after her manual trigger point release, but as Lis worked with him and the trigger points became fewer, he could sit for whole sessions quite often as she worked her trigger point release magic! Lis also shows me various exercises to do with him. She gave some simple exercises and massage techniques for us to do at home to keep his range of motion as good as possible. We also do the massage techniques she shows us so we can keep some of the trigger points at bay. With the sessions with Lis, we can see changes in Raji immediately: he seems brighter and moves better after she works out all the kinks!

Raji

Just a few days ago, unfortunately, Raji had a vestibular episode. Our vet and the folks at VMC were kind enough to lend a hand. The VMC lent us a special harness to help him get up and walk. So far, he hasn’t been successful, but we are working on bringing him back to his old self. It is nice to know everyone is concerned and willing to help Raji get better. We look forward to resuming his therapies soon!

~McCoy Family

Diagnosis:

  • Rhinitis & Sinusitis
  • Presumptive Hind End Osteoarthritis & Weakness
  • Compensating Muscle Pain
  • Myofascial Trigger Points
  • Vestibular Syndrome

Treatment:

  • Acupuncture
  • Lacer Acupuncture
  • Low Level Laser Therapy
  • Dry Needle Trigger Point Therapy
  • Soft Tissue Mobilization
  • Myofascial Trigger Point Release (Manual)
  • Home Exercise Program
  • Medications, Multiple Herbal Therapies, Supplements

 

VMC's May Patient of the Month

Petunia's Story

Petunia

Petunia was the runt of her litter and we believe that is why her spirit is especially strong.  Since the day she came home with her brother Ruben, she has made it very clear that she is the alpha.  Although she may be tiny, she has always gone out of her way to prove that she is the ruler of the roost. It is especially humorous since Ruben and the rest of the animals could not care less.

At her very first vet visit, the doctor warned that she was a 'lemon' and she should be returned to the breeder. Obviously, this was out of the question.  Shortly after several consultations, she was taken to Los Angeles at just 3 months old to have surgery on her heart.  The procedure was very successful, reducing her heart murmur significantly. We were so relieved and Petunia's new strength was remarkable. Growing up in Sunny San Diego, the two Frenchies frequented dog beaches and parks; playing fetch was their favorite thing to do!  Petunia was fast and coordinated, bounding to get her ball. Unlike her brother who often tumbled and fumbled the ball -- he usually held on to it for dear life, knowing Petunia would happily have both balls to herself.

It was not until Petunia was 9 years old that she showed a change in her gait.  At first it was just once and a while, when running full speed for her ball, that her hind legs would go limp. She hardly seemed to notice and would still propel herself for the ball.  After several similar occurrences, we decided to have her seen by a neurosurgeon in Northern San Diego. After examining her, it was predicted that she had bulging discs in two parts of her spine. An MRI would confirm if surgery was even an option, knowing that surgery would only prevent more damage from being done, but would not reverse any of the immobility that she was already experiencing. With Petunia's heart condition and age, anesthesia for the MRI was not encouraged, let alone for the intensive surgery that may follow. The doctors noted that any pain she was experiencing was not affecting her attitude or eating habits and that we should proceed by minimizing her exertion at the park and try some anti-inflammatories to see if that may relieve any pressure in her spinal column. She tested out some mild steroids with little benefits.

Meanwhile, a move to Boston was in process and soon she met with the doctors at Angell Medical Hospital.  First she saw the neurosurgeons and heart specialist, seeking second opinions and advice on how to proceed.  At this point she was becoming more and more wobbly in her hips- coined as 'drunken sailor' movement.  Her spirit was still strong, but she was not able to move like she once had.  After concluding that any operation was too risky with no guarantee of positive results, she went to see Dr. Lisa Moses for acupuncture. After Petunia's first visit with Dr. Moses, she was noticeably more comfortable and showed strong action in her hind quarters. She found relief from pain and reduced inflammation immediately and it seemed like a miracle. As almost two years passed, Petunia's condition did continue to worsen, as expected.  She tried out water therapy and was fitted for some wheels. Still, it was obvious how much she rebounded after acupuncture. Her relief was visible and her love for Dr. Moses was palpable.

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When Petunia moved to the Syracuse area, Dr. Moses recommended the VMC and Dr. Fleckenstein. For almost a year now she has been working with Dr. Fleckenstein and Lis. For the first time she was given exercises and stretches to work on at home. She started taking Chinese Herbs and has minimized her steroid intake, with positive results.  She looks forward to her weekly visits to see Dr. Fleckenstein, Sue, and our other lovely assistants. With ample treats and comfy bedding always set up, Ruben enjoys almost as much pampering when he comes along to accompany his sister. Together, we are all forever grateful for their tender and thoughtful care.  We simply cannot thank you enough!

~Gregg Family

Diagnosis:

  • Hind Limb Paraparesis Secondary to Presumptive Intervertebral Disc Disease and Congenital Vertebral Abnormalities

Treatment:

  • Acupuncture, Electroacupuncture & Lacer Acupuncture for Pain, Nerve Stimulation, Heart Disease, Urinary and Immune Support & General Well Being.
  • Methyl Prednisone, Gabapentin, Chinese Herbal Formula—Loranthus Powder
  • Canine Cart
  • Under Water Treadmill, Low Level Laser Therapy for muscle spasms and Home Exercise & Stretching Program including Home Water Therapy

March Patient of the Month

Sophia's Story

Sophia Robinson

 

Sophia is a 6 ½ year old German Shepherd. She has always been an old soul whose demeanor  has changed the minds of numerous people who used to be apprehensive of German Shepherds. She brings countless joy to everyone she meets. Unfortunately, when she was two, she was diagnosed with hip dysplasia. The medications she was put on made her a zombie, so we proceeded to seek out alternative pain management. After asking countless dog friends, the answer was unanimous that we must go see “Dr. Polly.” Her acupuncture treatments became a true pleasure for Sophia. She looks forward to seeing Dr. Polly Fleckenstein, Sue and all the CCRs at VMC. She goes from obvious pain on the way there, to acting like a puppy when she is done with her treatment.

About 8 months ago Sophie fell going up the stairs at our house. We immediately went for an acupuncture treatment and then to Dr. Lee.  Between Dr. Polly and Dr. Lee they realized that Sophie was suffering from nerve pain in her back. Dr. Robinson was suggested by many friends and vets as our next step.  After looking at her x-rays he determined that she needed an MRI at Cornell to confirm that she had Lumbosacral Syndrome.  Once that was confirmed she was put on a medication and acupuncture therapy.  It didn’t take my husband and I long to realize that we needed to treat this more aggressively, as she was not getting better. She was no longer “our Sophia” as she was sad and zombie-like.

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After a wonderful consult with Dr. Robinson discussing exactly what the surgery and rehab would entail, we then decided surgery was our best option. Post-op after surgery, we saw an immediate change; her eyes were SO beautiful and back to how they were before all of the pain! Since surgery we have been back to acupuncture and even added physical rehabilitation with Lis! Sophia loves all the attention of doing her exercises and massages with me! The WHOLE team at VMC has made it so that I have my Sophia back. Not only me, Sophia will be headed back to her role as a therapy dog as well!  Because of VMC and Sophia’s “team” she is again bringing joy to everyone she meets and living a full, pain-free life!

~Robinson Family

 

Diagnosis:

  • Chronic Mild Hip Dysplasia
  • Lumbosacral Disease
  • Thoracolumbar Osteoarthritis

Treatment:

  • Dorsal Laminectomy surgery
  • Electroacupuncture
  • Low Level laser therapy
  • Myofascial Trigger Point Release
  • Massage & Joint Mobilization
  • Underwater Treadmill Therapy
  • Therapeutic Exercise  Program
  • Cosequin DS
  • Duralactin
  • Gabapentin
  • EFA supplementation

 

 

 

 

VMC's November Patient of the Month

Simba's Story

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Simba had no history of any physical ailments. He was on a routine walk one afternoon when another dog got away from its owner and ran toward Simba. Simba turned his body and his neck quickly to move away from the other dog, and suddenly dropped to the ground. All four legs were stiff, he was breathing very heavily, panting hard, and his eyes were looking around panicked. He wouldn’t move, and then his tongue started to swell and turn purple. I quickly got him into the car and rushed to my vet, Lyncourt Veterinary Hospital.

There, Simba was given oxygen and examined for the cause of the problem. He still wasn’t moving, and was still very panicked. Simba couldn’t understand what was happening. In fact, he was so scared that he put himself into cardiac arrest and was not breathing at all for several minutes. The vet administered several shots of epinephrine in order to revive him, at which point he was transferred directly to the Veterinary Medical Center.

Dr. Luschini was able to stabilize Simba, although his heart rate was still very high and he still wasn’t moving at all. He couldn’t move his limbs or his tail, and he couldn’t even bark. But he was alive and breathing. He was placed into one of the beds at the Veterinary Medical Center, connected to an IV and a urinary catheter, and kept overnight for observation. Still not moving the next day, Dr. Fleckenstein evaluated Simba and began acupuncture treatment, while Lis Conarton assessed him and began physical therapy. Because Simba couldn’t move or stand on his own, Lis started him in a “cart” with harnesses that held him up in a standing position and moved on wheels to start exercising his legs. We also did “range of motion” exercises to prevent atrophy in his muscles.

After 3 days of stabilization at VMC, and still unsure of the exact cause of this ailment, we transferred Simba to Cornell University’s School of Veterinary Medicine for an MRI.   The MRI revealed that Simba had a disc degenerating in his spine in his neck, and a small piece of cartilage had likely broken off when he turn his neck away from the other dog.  This had  punctured his spinal cord – impacting his entire central nervous system and paralyzing him. No doctor could give us a clear prognosis for his recovery.

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Simba returned to the Veterinary Medical Center the next day, and remained hospitalized for nearly two weeks. It was days before he could eat on his own, and a week before he was able to urinate on his own. But he still couldn’t stand. All of the doctors and technicians continued their work and exercises with him multiple times throughout each day.

 

When Simba finally came home, we still had a lot of work to do. We purchased a “Help ‘Em Up” full-body harness that has handles at either end to help us lift Simba, so that we could carry him outside to go to the bathroom, and help him to get up and moving around for his at-home physical therapy exercises. We also brought him in to the VMC multiple times for acupuncture, PT with Lis, and evaluations by the doctors. Over the next three months, Simba slowly made progress.

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Simba is now miraculously up and walking, even running, and nearly 100% back to his old self. Throughout the entire experience, our family had to make tough decisions – but the team and support at VMC saved our dog’s life. ~Simba’s Family

Simba: 5 year old golden retriever mix

Diagnosis Spinal cord damage & temporary paralysis

Treatments Hospitalization MRI Acupuncture Laser Therapy Underwater Treadmill Home Exercise Program Pain Management Medications

VMC's (Belated) October Patient of the Month!

Abby's Story

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Abby started her journey with the VMC in 2009 when she was 9 years old. Prior to the VMC, Abby had surgery in the early 2000’s to repair both cruciate ligaments in her hind legs. She was experiencing some discomfort due to resulting osteoarthritis and trigger points in her shoulders (as she compensated for her knees). Abby had also been diagnosed with Laryngeal Paralysis (LP) which restricted her breathing. We had consulted with a surgical veterinarian regarding the LP; however, he felt surgery was not warranted yet and suggested acupuncture. Hearing Dr. Fleckenstein was the local expert, Abby started acupuncture sessions at the VMC with the added benefit of reducing the pain associated with the osteoarthritis and trigger points.

As Abby’s breathing became more labored due to the LP, Dr. Robinson at VMC  performed a unilateral tieback surgery to reduce the restriction caused by her larynx. Now able to breathe better, and with her joint/muscle pain under control, Abby was back to acting like her old self, an active pup, again. After Abby’s tieback surgery, we continued acupuncture sessions and introduced supplements recommended by Dr. Fleckenstein to help with the osteoarthritis. Abby would become so relaxed and comfortable during acupuncture that she would fall asleep during her treatments.

Dr. Fleckenstein thought Abby could benefit from the addition of physical rehab, so in 2010 we started rehab with Lis Conarton. Abby’s physical rehab includes laser therapy for her joints, manual trigger point release, and walking on the underwater treadmill. Lis also provided us with a home exercise program including massage, range of motion exercises, swimming, and walking at the beach. Abby adores Lis and is very accommodating even when Lis is working out her painful trigger points! In 2013, Abby was diagnosed with a hemangiopericytoma, a soft tissue sarcoma, below her right eye. After consultation with Dr. Rassnick at the VMC, Dr. Robinson again performed surgery on Abby – this time to remove the sarcoma. Unfortunately, the sarcoma could not be removed completely due to the location, so Dr. Robinson implanted a few chemotherapy beads. Dr. Rassnick also recommended the addition of low dose metronomic chemotherapy to prevent the sarcoma from growing, which Abby has tolerated well. We continue to see Dr. Rassnick and we’re happy to report Abby has had no regrowth of the sarcoma for almost 2 years.

Abby swimming 10-15

Abby loves going to the VMC! The office and medical staff welcome her with so much loving attention, it doesn’t matter whether she’s here for surgery with Dr. Robinson, bloodwork with Dr. Rassnick, acupuncture with Dr. Fleckenstein or rehab with Lis. With the wonderful care provided by the VMC, Abby is now almost 15 years old. Abby continues her rehab with Lis, home exercise, and supplements to maintain her quality of life and allow her to age comfortably and gracefully. ~ Abby’s Loving Family

VMC Services Providing Care: • Acupuncture • Surgery • Physical Rehabilitation • Oncology

Diagnoses: • Laryngeal Paralysis • Hemangiopericytoma • Osteoarthritis – Knees • Myofascial Trigger points

Treatments: • Surgery • Metronomic Chemotherapy • Acupuncture • Laser therapy • Manual Trigger Point Release • Home Exercise Program • Supplements • Underwater Treadmill Hydrotherapy

August Pain Management Patient of the Month

Lady's Story Lady August 2015

Owning a pair of dachshunds with “dog-a-titude” can make for some interesting adventures for their owners. Our first adventure started with one of Lady and Jackson’s play sessions in 2011. We heard a yip from Lady as she ran under our bed. Unfortunately for Lady, she had run into a wire from one of the support beams for the bed frame. This had pierced a hole in her back.

In a panic, we contacted the Veterinary Medical Center and they advised us to bring her in immediately through the Emergency Service. Upon arrival, the staff had taken Lady in for evaluation and found that, she would need to undergo surgery to repair the hole and she had intervertebral disk disease (IVDD). Needless to say, we moved forward with the surgery and discussed our options for the IVDD. Initially, Lady was treated with antibiotics, Metacam and Tramadol. Once the wound was healed we no longer needed the antibiotics, but continued with the Metacam and Tramadol for the IVDD. We did not like the idea of keeping Lady on the Metacam, Tramadol, and Gabapentin so we looked at holistic options such as: physical therapy, acupuncture, veterinary spinal manipulation therapy (VSMT), and laser treatments.

We started bi-weekly treatments of acupuncture, spinal manipulation, and laser treatments with Dr. Polly Fleckenstein. Also, during our visits with Polly we also learned how to give Lady doggie massages. Since Lady also needed to strengthen her muscles in her legs and back, we also worked with Lis Conarton and the physical rehabilitation service. Lis started Lady with simple stretches and worked her way up to the underwater treadmill. Seeing my little dachshund wearing a life jacket and walking on the underwater treadmill was quite a sight!

Lady and Jackson August 2015

At this point in time Lady has finished her physical therapy and is making monthly visits to Dr. Fleckenstein for her acupuncture, VSMT and laser treatments. As a matter of fact, when we tell Lady that she is going to visit Dr. Fleckenstein she heads to the door with her tail wagging. We cannot say enough about the professional staff and services that are offered at the Veterinary Medical Center of CNY. We have been truly blessed to have found such a wonderful gifted staff. ~The Kleinwaks Family

Lady's Problem: Intervertebral Disc Disease

Current Treatments:

  • Electroacupuncture & Lacer Acupuncture every 4-6 weeks
  • Veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapy every 4-6 weeks
  • Home exercise program including massage, stretches & exercise
  • Multi-Modal Pain Management Program

June 2015 VMC Pain Management Patient of the Month

Puccini's Story Puccini

My husband and I are proud owners of our 11 year old standard poodle named Puccini. Since Puccini was the runt of a litter of six, he weighs only 42 pounds, whereas, typically, the breed weighs between 60-70 pounds. During Puccini’s initial veterinary visit, Dr. Davis at Lyndon Veterinary Clinic, advised us that sometimes the runt of a litter can develop a variety of health challenges. Clearly, this has proven to be so for our dog. Beginning as early as 3 yrs. old, Dr. Davis diagnosed Puccini with hip dysplasia, with the right hip significantly worse than the left. Just looking at the x-ray of Puccini’s right hip, Dr. Davis commented, “you wouldn’t think he could walk.” Dr. Davis prescribed Cosequin double strength twice a day, and he modified Puccini’s playtime eliminating the run/stop action which was bad for his back legs. In 2009, Dr. Davis diagnosed Puccini with Intervertebral Disc Disease. Dr. Davis referred us to Cornell Companion Animal Hospital where they discovered that Puccini’s hind limb muscles had atrophied. At that time, they recommended Lis Conarton and the Physical Rehabilitation Service at the Veterinary Medical Center. Lis evaluated Puccini, and provided us with a thorough understanding of the problems and challenges he may encounter. She highlighted the various techniques she would use on Puccini including: laser therapy; the underwater treadmill; the “agility course”; and the importance of addressing the Myofascial Trigger Points (muscle knots). We were impressed with Lis—her breadth of knowledge, her professional demeanor, her patience, and Puccini who doesn’t like meeting people warmed right up to her immediately. Lis has been able to markedly improve Puccini’s muscle strength and maintain his muscle mass. Due to Puccini’s aging process, Lis has continually modified his rehab sessions, along with the home exercise program. She informs Dr. Davis of her observations about Puccini which has produced a “winning team” for our dog. We are convinced that Puccini’s quality of life is very good because of Lis. We are not taking anything away from Dr. Davis, who is a great veterinarian, but Lis has skills that are not widely available. We refer to Lis as the “animal whisperer”. Lis is an amazing and talented young woman, who possesses the desire to stay abreast of everything related to her profession. We are always recommending the VMC and Lis to anyone who has an animal in need, because she treats each animal as if she is the owner. To this day, we count our blessings that physical rehabilitation is available in Syracuse and that a highly knowledgeable, competent, and talented woman by the name of Lis Conarton manages the area. ~Puccini’s Family

Puccini

  • 11 year old Standard Poodle
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Cervical Disc Disease/Intervertebral Disc Disease
  • Right Cruciate Ligament Strain
  • Compensatory Muscle Strain & Myofascial Trigger Points
  • Irritable Bowel Disease

Current Treatments

Weekly Rehabilitation Sessions Including:

  • Hydrotherapy Exercise
  • Under Water Treadmill
  • Low Level Laser Therapy
  • Joint Mobilization
  • Massage Including-Myofascial Trigger Point Release
  • Home Exercise Program
  • Home Massage Program

What You Should Know About Pain and the Goals of Pain Management

acupuncture DEFINITION OF PAIN (according to The International Association for the Study of Pain):   An unpleasant and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.

Pain is the most common reason humans seek medical attention.  Unfortunately most doctors are not specifically educated in the management of chronic pain.  This is also true of the veterinary profession.   To further complicate matters, we (pet owners and veterinarians) face a particularly challenging task in assessing our nonverbal pets and patients that evolutionarily have developed instincts to hide disease and pain.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT:  The inability to communicate in no way negates the possibility that an individual is experiencing pain and is in need of appropriate pain relieving treatment.

Here at the Veterinary Medical Center of CNY, our Pain Management team members have devoted hundreds of hours in advanced training to recognize and treat pain in our patients.  Our approach is to address pain by incorporating multiple “modalities” which may include medications, physical rehabilitation, acupuncture, myofascial trigger point therapy, and other treatments.  The primary professionals on our team, Dr. Michelle Burnett, Dr. Polly Fleckenstein, and Certified Physical Rehabilitation Provider Lis Conarton, LVT, are consistently receiving advanced formal training in veterinary pain management, making them uniquely qualified to assist your pet.

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Pain and function are connected.  Changes in activity, behavior, and physical ability may all be indicators of pain in pets.  Pain can negatively affect muscle function, and muscle (myofascial) disease, in turn, can be a major cause of pain.  This connection means that medications alone rarely allow a chronic pain patient to recover.  Our pain-specific nerve pathways and our muscles are no different than our joints, our hearts, or our eyes – they are all susceptible to major breakdown in their form and function.  Medications alone may alleviate some symptoms, but often will not address the source of the pain.

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To achieve the best possible results we apply a coordinated strategy, bringing together a broad range of therapeutic options available to us.  This strategy is based on the individual needs of the patient and integrates all available therapeutic options to obtain the best possible patient outcome.  Once we have the patient stabilized at their optimal level, we then gradually decrease the therapies (both physical and medicine based) until we find the minimum required to maintain patient comfort and quality of life.

Advanced pain medications help “reset” the pain pathways to a less sensitized state.  This can have an immediate effect on patient comfort and function.   Concentration on rehabilitation and strengthening, however, is crucial to the restoration of long standing comfort and return to function.

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The general approach that many veterinarians take in treating pain is by prescribing, almost exclusively, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as Deramaxx, Rimadyl or Metacam.  Interestingly, NSAIDs are the most commonly used pain medication in veterinary practice but also have the greatest potential for causing damage to the kidneys, liver and/or the gastrointestinal (GI) system.   Aging pets are the most likely to be chronically painful, and are also most likely to have some compromise of kidney, liver or GI function.  Regardless of  age, any pet on an NSAID drug should be closely monitored (bloodwork and possibly urinalysis) on a regular basis.

Fortunately, we have other options.  If you are concerned and want more answers now, contact us at 315-446-7933 and ask to speak with our Pain Management Service. More information is also available on our website www.vmccny.com

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Written by Dr. Michelle Burnett, Director of VMC's Pain Management Service

Is Your Pet in Pain?

Recognizing Pain in our Pets

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How do we know our pet is experiencing pain?

Pets feel pain for many of the same reasons as humans: dental problems, infections, arthritis, disease and cancer as well as discomfort after surgical procedures. There are certain signs and changes in behavior that can indicate when a pet is suffering. As a pet owner, you are in the best position to notice those often subtle changes. The sooner your dog's pain is diagnosed and treated, the sooner he or she can heal and resume a normal, happy life.

Out of instinct, many animals will hide their pain. This is most common in our cats. In the wild, animals that appear sick or injured are vulnerable to predators. For this reason, our pets often disguise the fact they are in pain.

Also true is that our pets do not simply slow down because they are aging. Age is not a disease. If your senior dog or cat is less active, it is likely because there is something wrong and may very well be that he is suffering from arthritis pain or some other type of pain.

The most obvious signs of pain are crying, whimpering, growling and limping. A common misconception is that a pet that is limping is not painful because he/she is not vocal or is still willing to play and chase the ball. The fact is, an animal that is not painful does not limp (assuming that there are no anatomical abnormalities that result in an abnormal gait). If your dog or cat is limping, it is because his/her leg hurts. There are many reasons the leg may hurt but the bottom line is that your pet is in pain!

Behaviors that may indicate pain: 

  • pacing
  • restlessness
  • reluctance to move or reluctance to lie down
  • trembling
  • facial expression frequently vacant stare, wide eyed, and/or  grimacing
  • posture rigid, hunched back
  • decreased appetite or not eating at all
  • hiding or avoiding contact versus interactive and asking for attention
  • aggression
  • generally “grumpy"
  • “accidents” in the house/soiling outside litterbox
  • doesn’t want to be picked up
  • guarding a body part
  • focused on one part of their body – licking, biting, scratching or staring at a body part
  • panting excessively
  • excessive grooming/not grooming at all
  • some animals will “talk” more when they are in pain where others may “talk” less than they normally do
  • unable to sleep/rest for long a period of time
  • circling, getting up and down on bedding
  • Sleeping excessively
  • withdrawn for long periods of time

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Treating pain Please do not try to treat your pet’s pain yourself. Many forms of human pain relief can be dangerous (even fatal) to our pets. Pain occurs for many different reasons and so treatments will depend on the diagnosis.   Pain relief options for our pets is a rapidly expanding field, and there are many safe therapies available.  We will explore some options for pain control in our next post. If you are concerned and want more answers now, contact us at 315-446-7933 and ask to speak with our Pain Management Service. More information is also available on our website www.vmccny.com  

Written by Dr. Michelle Burnett, Director of VMC's Pain Management Service